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Will Daniel Craig Become the Longest-Serving Bond?

The “James Bond” series is film’s most enduring franchise, so looking too far to the future is never unreasonable. As such, don’t blame producer Michael G. Wilson for already thinking about what to do with the series after next year’s Skyfall. He intends for Daniel Craig to carry on with the iconic role for some time after.

Speaking to the British Sunday tabloid The People, Wilson revealed he is planning to offer the 43-year-old Craig a lucrative multi-million pound deal, believed to be £8 Million ($12 Million), to make five more “Bond” movies. This would make Craig the longest-tenured Bond, which would break Roger Moore‘s record. Moore starred in seven Bonds during a 12-year period.

Wilson told The People:

Filming has gone very well so far and I’d love Daniel to surpass Roger’s record and do eight pictures. Daniel’s been an absolute pleasure to be around because he takes the role so seriously. There’s really no one more passionate about making these films work than him – he’s a film maker’s dream. A lot of people have said Daniel’s been their favourite Bond since Sean Connery and I can’t argue with them. He’s doing a great job.

This move certainly shows the producers have a lot of faith in Craig, whose Bond movies have been hits. Casino Royale was commercially the most successful Bond, and Craig’s performances have been highly praised. I agree with that assessment and love the new films. The only real concern is Craig’s age by the end of the contract. With “Bond” films usually taking 2-3 years to make a piece, it could be anywhere from 10-15 years for five more films, at which time Craig would be nearly 60.

Yet, when one hand gives, the other takes away, and if Craig agrees to this deal it would end my hopes of Michael Fassbender or Tom Hardy becoming the next Bond. But that’s just me.

Skyfall will hit theaters in the UK on October 26, 2012 and in the USA on Nov. 9.

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